Overcoming rejection in dating

When our spouse leaves us, when we get fired from our jobs, snubbed by our friends, or ostracized by our families and communities for our lifestyle choices, the pain we feel can be absolutely paralyzing.Whether the rejection we experience is large or small, one thing remains constant — it always hurts, and it usually hurts more than we expect it to. Why are we so bothered by a good friend failing to “like” the family holiday picture we posted on Facebook? Why would something so seemingly insignificant make us feel angry at our friend, moody, and bad about ourselves?(CNN) -- Online dating seems like the pinnacle of modernity, an online meat market where glassy-eyed humans browse possible suitors, sorted for ease of shopping by size, shape and moral fabric. " Along with this savanna comes permission to do stuff that'd get you a drink in the face I. Sure, online dating could benefit from a protocol overhaul in terms of courtesy, but begging everyone to change the rules this late in the game would be stupid.So advanced does it appear, so streamlined and slick-interfaced and "Jetsons"-esque, that it's easy to overlook a very basic truth: Online dating is the freaking savanna. As in, early humans tearing around the open grasslands without much regard for courtship courtesy. Instead, we'd like to tell you, starry-eyed romantics with big dreams of finding love: Toughen up. Stop weeping onto your keyboard in the online quest for love.When we type in our logins and go surfing for love, out come all our animalistic instincts: We refuse to give a second look to those who don't meet our physical requirements, rudely ignore those we don't find worthy and generally let our ids run wild. " we think gleefully, our brains reverting to caveman-like activity. In short: Online dating is not for the easily offended.So if you're offering your heart up to the WWW gods, don't be too put off by the following social un-graces.With the right mindset, rejection can even help you in the long run! Getting to that level of confidence can be difficult.

The expectation of being rejected is so disturbing and present that many people won’t make any attempts at all in the face of everything they imagine will happen to them when (not if) they get shot down.

It happens to all of us at some point in our lives.

When we get rejected we can’t help but stop and ask ourselves some questions. ” Then come the thoughts that we rehearse over and over again.

This is what so many tragic shootings stem from — hatred develops after obsessive thinking becomes justification for an offense to punish others for their actions.

When rejection is from a family member or someone we are in a serious relationship with, it’s hard to move on right away.

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